Author Archives: Ed Mezer

How to Pack Fragile Items When You Move

This entry was posted in Packing Tips and tagged , on by .

When it comes to your belongings, some items are certainly more fragile than others. Fine art, glassware, and other antiques require careful packing and handling, as well as proper storage, in order to remain in pristine condition, especially if a mover is handling your items. Whether you’re packing a valuable set of delicate china or even just a few old photographs, here are some tips to keep your fragile and valuable items safe during the move.

How to Pack Fragile Items When You MovePrepare in advance

When preparing for a move, the first thing you should do is sit down and create a list of all your delicate, valuable, or fragile items. This inventory list will be invaluable in the rare, but oh-so-unfortunate event that anything breaks or goes missing during the move and you end up having to make an insurance claim.

In addition to creating an inventory list, it’s also important to take a few photographs of each item.

How to pack and store the most popular fragile items

Fine China

If you’re packing different kinds of fine china or dishes, start by grouping like items together – plates with plates, bowls with bowls, cups with cups, saucers with saucers, and so on. Neatly wrap each item in tissue paper, keeping them organized by type and size. Use scotch tape to secure the tissue paper, rather than packing tape, as packing tape is very strong and can easily rip right through tissue paper.

Once the pieces are wrapped with tissue paper, wrap each piece with bubble paper, covering every exposed area. You should no longer feel the china underneath the padding.

If you’re packing china plates, you can stack them, but keep in mind that if the plates are heavy, you should not stack more than 5 plates at a time. If they’re light and small like saucers or bread plates, you can stack up to 6 plates. Use your best judgment here!

Glassware

Wrap glasses individually with packing paper, plain newsprint, or bubble wrap. To ensure that wrapping stays in place, secure it with a small strip of scotch tape. Glasses and delicate stemware are best protected from damage when they’re packed in boxes that are divided into individual cells, like this one.

Everyday glassware, from all purpose drinkware to casual stemware, should be stored in a dry, dust, and pest-free environment. While unpacking, you might be tempted to crowd your cabinets with as many glasses as possible, but it’s best to let them breathe and allow for some wiggle room. This will prevent scratches, as well as any accidental breakage.

Silver

Air can cause silverware to tarnish, so it’s important that all silverware pieces – flatware, coffee sets, dishes – are wrapped completely in clean, unprinted packing or tissue paper. Loose silverware should be wrapped in sets with clear plastic, tissue, or packing paper.

If your silverware is in a chest, you still may want to consider wrapping the pieces individually and repositioning them. You can fill all empty spaces in the chest with tissue paper or clean paper towels and wrap the chest with a large blanket or bath towel for further protection.

Vintage Photographs

Prolonged exposure to direct sunlight can cause fading and loss of sheet integrity. To keep your old photographs in pristine condition during the move, it’s important to protect them from light as much as possible.

If unframed, the best way to store old photographs is in archival storage materials or a dark container, such as a Solander Box. Make sure that all materials are labeled “acid free” when looking to purchase scrapbooks, filing cabinets, or other packing and storage materials.

Fine Art

Handle artwork as little as possible. Finger oils can damage artwork by leaving smudges and oily residue. Especially when caring for prints and works on paper, you can greatly reduce the risks of creases, bends, or smudges by carrying paper by the two corners or by supporting the work from underneath, rather than pinching it.

It’s also important to remember to only lean canvases against a flat surface. However obvious,  leaning the front or back of a stretched canvas against a sharp or pointed object, no matter how small, will leave a dent that could irreparably damage the piece. If you lean a work of art against anything, make sure to lean it on the wood of its stretcher bars to ensure that nothing presses against the canvas.

Label your boxes

Once you’ve successfully packed your boxes, make sure to label each one with your name, the contents, and a vertical arrow pointing upward to indicate that the box should not be loaded on its side. In addition, the words “FRAGILE” or “HANDLE WITH CARE” should be displayed prominently on at least two adjacent sides of each box.

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Office Moving Checklist and Timeline

Moving to a new office space is just as involved a process as moving to a new home. You’ve got big, bulky office furniture, difficult-to-pack electronics, and multiple rooms worth of knick-knacks to get packed up. And usually, there’s not a whole lot of time to get it all done (you can’t exactly shut down operations for a week to sort things out). Whether you’re moving to a new floor or across the country, office relocation is a lot of work, regardless of the size of your company. If you’re trying to navigate one, use this our timeline and checklist as your guide to moving to a new office space.

Office Moving Checklist and TimelineOffice move planning can start as early as a year before your move date, but six months is typically when you start looking for relocation services and start planning the logistics of a business move. Here is our step-by-step timeline to help you stay organized.

6 months before your move

Here’s what you need to consider six months before an office move.

Review the current lease

If the lease for your current office isn’t up yet, will you lose your deposit? What repairs do you need to do before you hand the key over to the landlord? Are you responsible for property damage such as broken lights or chipped paint?

Designate an in-office moving team

Do you want to be involved in every aspect of the moving process or just some? Are you the point person or should you assign that responsibility to someone else on your team? Delegate some tasks to your moving project management team, clearly defining roles. Who is planning, packing, unpacking, organizing, decorating?

Make a decommissioning plan

Decommissioning goes way beyond just cleaning your old office. Decommissioning is more like restoring it to its original condition before you moved in. It includes removing cables and electrical installations, fixtures, signs and logos, furniture, and so on. It also involves repairs to the property damage and even small things like replacing burnt-out lightbulbs. Your lease should specify the details, and if you don’t want legal trouble or to lose your security deposit, the lease conditions must be adhered to. Make a decommissioning plan early and discuss with your moving team how to assign related tasks.

Set a budget

You might have to adjust it down the road, but at least having some idea from the get-go how much you’ll have to spend will be immensely helpful when you talk to the moving companies. Determine what your non-negotiables are, and think about where you can scale back to save some money. Also, consider the purchasing process. Who will make all the move-related purchases and how will the vendors be paid?

Decide on the level of moving coverage 

Professional moving companies offer at least one type of coverage called released value protection. It’s basic, however, at up to 60 cents per pound. This moving insurance is federally mandated and is included in the move but will only cover so much. You can always replace damaged furniture, but what is something more crucial to your continued business operations, like electronics? It pays to be protected. Think whether you should buy full value protection coverage, which offers significantly more protection, or expand mover coverage further by buying third-party insurance. Deciding on what type of insurance you’ll need will help budget the move more accurately and also communicate your moving-insurance needs to the moving companies.

Start a to-do list

Since more than one person will be involved in planning and organizing the office move, it’s a good idea to start a box or a folder with all your notes and lists. It’s even better if it’s done online. For example, as a collection of Google docs in a simple folder on Google Drive. Centralizing information is a good strategy.

Announce the move to your employees and seek feedback

Plan to send an email and then follow up with an in-person or online meeting. The email should include the new office address, moving date, key features of the new office, the reason for the move, and key dates for the moving process employees should be aware of. After a week or two, schedule an in-person meeting, if possible (or employees can attend remotely), to receive feedback and answer any questions.

Your employees might request changes in workspace needs or work style preferences, especially if the new office has both open and private floor plans. If your company is small, consider one-on-one meetings. If it’s large, and holding a meeting that everyone can attend is not feasible, you can try sending a survey or organizing department meetings. Encourage all employees to keep the move in mind when they plan or take on new projects.

Make sure everything will fit in the new office

While you may intend to bring that massive break-room fridge with you, the dimensions of the kitchen space in your new break-room might not allow for it. Instead of wasting time, energy and money on transporting items that aren’t going to work in your new office space, get the dimensions of your largest items and compare them to the measurements of your next location. This applies to things like your conference room tables, large electrical equipment, and anything else that necessitates a lot of space. Hopefully, you have chosen a new office that allows for the accommodation of your existing furniture and tech, but if you haven’t, you’ll want to know that before you move in — not after.

Make an inventory

Now that you know what will and won’t fit, record what you’re taking and what you’re leaving behind. Even if you’re on a tight budget, you might have to leave some things behind, especially if the new office’s floor plan is different. A full inventory will help you communicate your moving needs to your moving coordinator and will give you a clear picture of the items you’ll need to leave behind (and replace them after the move if necessary).

3-4 months before your move

Here’s what you need to do three to four months before an office move.

Lock in your moving date

By now you have price-compared and settled on one moving company. Make a reservation as soon as you can to secure the date.

Solidify your moving plan

Set dates and tasks for your moving plan. Think about when are the phones getting disconnected. When do the desks need to be cleared? Figure out when the internet connection getting set up in the new office. Assign team leaders and hand out responsibilities to team members (or have the team leaders do it).

Announce the moving date to your employees

Let your employees know the moving date. Communicate your expectations of when their cubicles, offices or workstations need to be packed up, when the utilities are getting disconnected, and so on. If you expect the employees to lift any boxes, ask them if there are any health restrictions. Make sure each employee knows what’s expected of them and when.

Notify your current landlord

As soon as you confirm your company’s move date, tell your current landlord or property manager when you plan to terminate your lease.

Notify outside the company

Let your partners, clients, vendors and anyone else you have business associations with that you’re moving. They will need to know your new contact information and might have questions about how the move will affect them.

Come up with a plan for specialized equipment

Do you need help moving especially heavy equipment or hazardous materials? Order ahead items that take a while to build and ship? Are you replacing or upgrading any specialized equipment that requires special handling?

Hire moving vendors

Even if you hired a full-service moving company that will do the packing and unpacking for you, you might have to seek out other vendors for your move-related needs. If your new office needs landscaping or decorating, now is the time to hire an interior designer. You might also need to hire an office cleaner if the movers or your building don’t offer this service and your current one wouldn’t be able to handle the post-move cleanup.

Start gathering moving supplies

Unless your office already has everything it needs to pack up, or the movers will be packing you, get a head start on purchasing and organizing your packing materials and moving supplies. Chances are your office probably already has a lot of supplies (some boxes, markers, scissors, labels), but you probably still need to source some specialty boxes, packing tape and packing paper. Buy it now. Get creative sourcing your supplies, too. You can get free boxes and other free packing supplies at a lot of places. For more information about what supplies you need, check out our guide to choosing the right moving and packing supplies.

Downsize

Purge with an open mind and tag anything that is going to be sold or donated. Consider an office warehouse sale or arrange a charity to do a free donation pickup.

Talk to your employees again

Surely by now you have made some adjustments to the moving plan and have updates. Continue your ongoing communication with your employees as they will have questions and concerns. Invite questions or feedback by email, send out important moving updates, and remind them of the new office’s features, including anything they need to know about on-site parking, entering the building, access cards, the new neighborhood, and so on.

2 months before your move

Here’s what you need to do two months before an office move.

Design a floor plan

Determine where the office equipment and furniture will go, where the employees will be sitting, and where the common areas will be. If possible, get an idea of where the Ethernet connections and power sockets are so you’ll know where to set up the tech equipment.

Schedule disconnection, transfer and set up services

Set up internet, phone installation and utilities at the new office. Besides water and electricity setup, you might need to set up garbage and recycling pickup or security services. Plan with your IT to set up computers at the new location. Can they do it internally or do they need help from the outside vendors? Let any vendors (landscaping, security, cleaning) servicing your current office know that you will have to discontinue or transfer their services.

Buy new furniture or equipment

If you’re replacing or adding any office equipment and furniture, start purchasing now as it will take to ship and assemble. You might need help with furniture installation, and decorating takes time.

Reserve offsite storage

Reserve a commercial storage unit near your new office if you don’t have room for stuff like old files, holiday decorations and office furniture you don’t need now but might use in the future.

Come up with a company-wide labeling system

You’re your preferred labeling system — numbers, colors, shapes — as long as it’s consistent throughout the office and all employees are using it.

Start packing

The non-essentials you won’t need in the weeks leading to the move can be packed now. Get it out of the way now so you can prioritize important tasks like packing necessities.

Put address change orders in place

It’s better to start updating documents with your new address earlier rather than later, so place your orders for new business cards, letterhead, envelopes, return labels, etc. right when you know your new address. It’s much better to have all of your updated documents on hand before your move than to risk going days or weeks without them in your new space.

Check on the new office

Does it need cleaning? Can you start decorating and bringing the non-essential items you’ve packed?

1 month before your move

Here’s what you need to do one month before an office move.

Keep tagging furniture, equipment and office supplies

It’s a process, so you won’t be done in a day. Check in with your moving team to make sure the tagging is on track and the employees have what they need to pack their desks.

Finalize plans with your moving team

Confirm the move date once again, and see if there’s a need for a moving-day itinerary to coordinate moving logistics.

Order keys and access cards

Order keys and, if using, employee access cards for your new office in advance so they’ll be ready to hand out before the old office closes for good.

Back up data

Back up all important data on your computer, and use hard drive mirroring software to make a copy of your hard drive. That way if something happens to your computers in transit, you can replicate your current hard drive on a new system. You might want to scan some files to digitize them and shred the paper versions to lighten the load.

Coordinate moving truck departure and arrival

Work with your current and new building managers to secure loading and unloading times. If there are loading docks, great, but if parking is limited, or the area has heavy traffic, it might take some planning. Don’t wait till moving day.

Get a handle on building rules

Unless your company owns the building you are moving out of or into, you will need to get a full breakdown of all building rules around relocating. It may be that you are only allowed to move during non-business hours or that you must put in a special request to use the service elevator. Get these rules from building management as early as you can since it will dictate the logistics of moving day.

Try to move some non-essentials on your own first

Simplify moving day by transporting the little stuff as you can, provided there’s an overlap of timing with your new lease. You can make the whole moving process easier by taking over items like plants and bulk office supplies on your own, especially if you can get them set up in their new locations before you officially move in.

Assign everyone the task of packing up their own desk

While you may be having a moving company come in to take care of the big stuff, it will still be a major help to have everyone responsible for their own desk space. Give your staff a heads up on when they’ll need to have their desks packed up, and try to encourage them to do a little bit at a time so nobody is trying to get all packed up at the last minute. You may need to just give your team a couple of hours of time off on the day before the move to get their desks in order.

1 week before your move

Here’s what you need to do one week before an office move.

Update your address

Update the company website, your financial accounts, social media accounts, subscriptions and business listings (Google, Yelp, local directories) with your new office address. Not sure who else to notify when you move? See our change-of-address checklist. Most items apply to both residential and commercial moves.

Review your moving day schedule with the moving team

Go over what still needs to be done, when the movers arrive, what items should go first and last, who will be on-site to supervise the moving crew, and will lock up after they leave, and whether you will be tipping the movers and providing refreshments.

Remind employees to finish packing

Your IT crew will probably be packing up laptops, monitors and other IT equipment, but all employees should be finishing up clearing their desks and cubicles of office supplies and personal belongings.

Don’t forget IT

One of the biggest complications inherent in moving to a new office space is disconnecting and reconnecting all of your tech. This is a big job, and one that you can’t outsource to the movers, so it’s critical that your team gets to work on it as early as possible. If there are pieces of equipment that you’ll be getting rid of, set up a plan for recycling or donating them. If you’re planning to recycle unneeded equipment instead, check out the EPA’s resources on where and how to do it right.

The day before your move

Finish packing and labeling

By tomorrow everything should be packed and ready to be relocated. Do a walk-through to make sure that’s the case and do (or have someone else do it) the necessary last-minute packing.

Collect employee access cards and keys

Be sure to collect any company keys, parking passes and access cards to return to the landlord or property manager.

On moving day

Here’s what needs to be done on moving day.

Be at the old office to meet the movers

Make sure you (or someone from your office) are there to let the movers in and out, tip them, and provide refreshments (the last two are optional). Someone also should be there to clear a path for the movers if it hadn’t been done and to moderate the move. This includes letting the movers know what should be loaded first and last, pointing out any fragile boxes (even if they’re labeled), and pointing out what furniture items need disassembling.

Do a final walk-through of your vacated office

This is to see if any items were left behind and to document any property damage. Now is also the time to turn in all keys and parking passes unless you’ve made some arrangement with the property owner or manager. It’s a good idea to confirm the termination of your lease at the same time.

After your move

After your office move is complete, here are some action items to help you get settled in your new office space.

Unpack and test your technology

Unpack the essentials and test your phone, computers, servers, printers, and anything else you’re using. Troubleshoot as needed so you won’t miss any time conducting business.

Double-check your change-of-address updates

Confirm that everyone who needed to know was notified of your move, that your online presence lists the new address, and that any stationery, business cards, labels, etc. you are using have also been updated.

Meet with your post-move team

To make sure that you get back on track promptly and that your place of business looks like a professional office, discuss with your team who is removing tags, who is unpacking, and who is stocking the kitchen, restroom(s) and supply cabinets. They should divvy up those tasks among the employees.

Celebrate your new digs

An office relocation is stressful for everyone, including your employees. They deserve some downtime and recognition for their hard work. As a “thank you” for everyone’s cooperation in making it happen and as a way to celebrate your new space, budget in a small party for after the move. You don’t have to be completely set up yet, and it doesn’t have to be anything major — even a mid-day celebration luncheon sometime in the first week after moving will show your staff how much you appreciate their help and welcome exciting things at the new office.

Office moving FAQs

Moving offices can be daunting, and we are sure you have questions. Here are a few answers to the FAQs.

What is involved in an office move?

Planning and organizing your move involves working with your office’s moving team to go through all the steps required to move your office. These include researching, vetting and finding a moving company experienced in office relocations and working with them on the details of your unique move based on your needs and your budget. It also involves whipping your new office in shape, be it cleaning, decorating or remodeling. You should also leave your old office in the condition it was in before you moved in. Otherwise, you risk losing your deposit and facing legal issues.

Office moves also involve changing your address everywhere you have it on your office supplies and online presence, and letting people know. You will be downsizing once you decide what must come with and what you no longer need or won’t fit into the new office. Of course, a fair amount of packing is involved and working with your employees to make sure they know their tasks and deadlines. Then you have to disconnect, transfer and set up all the tech and utilities, including the internet, electricity, computers, phones, servers, and so on. Post-move, you might have to clean your old office. Then, let the new office setup begin. And, hopefully, after all this, some celebration is in order.

How long does it take to relocate an office?

You can start planning as early as a year ahead, but we recommend beginning the process no later than six months before the move. There’s a lot to be done before the movers show up to load everything up. The actual move should be done within a few hours and up to a day for local moves. For long distances, it depends on how many miles your belongings will have to clock in while on the road, which could take a few days.

How can I successfully move my office?

Provided you follow the timeline above, we recommend that you:

  • Start early (six months before the move is ideal)
  • Create a moving team and appoint its manager
  • Do research to find the best moving company experienced in commercial moving
  • Assign employees tasks (like packing up their own desks)
  • Have a clear IT disconnect/transfer/setup plan
  • Know your new and old building rules
  • Put address change orders early on
  • Be diligent about labeling your boxes
  • Make sure that everything will fit into your new space (and downsize accordingly)
  • Move the non-essentials first (and maybe even on your own)
  • Have an office party to celebrate the move. You all deserved it!

What are the steps to move my office?

Planning and organizing an office move should start with setting up your budget and determining your moving needs. Then you work on finding and hiring a moving company and working with them and your employees on a moving plan with set deadlines. For more details, see our comprehensive checklist above.

Ready to organize your office move?

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Save Money Moving Tips

This entry was posted in Boston Moving Company and tagged , on by .

You may have heard or read on numerous occasions that the entire process of moving house can be a really stressful experience – an event riddled with unexpected and chaotic turns and twists that can rarely be controlled.

And to make things even more challenging than they really are, you must definitely be aware of the fact that moving all of your possessions from one home to another is also a rather expensive business to start with.

Add high moving costs to the stress of relocation and you get a dangerous combination that should be handled with much care. It is no wonder then that everyone’s desperately looking for the cheapest way to move across country.

If you yourself are moving on a budget, then you either know or suspect how difficult the road ahead of you will be. But don’t despair as the following cheap moving tips, ideas and tricks have been designed with one single purpose in mind: to help you move for less and thus save hard earned money on your local or cross country move.

Ready to learn how to move cheaply?

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Control your moving expenses

To know how to move cheaply will prove very beneficial for you when it’s time to pay up the moving bill, but the entire moving saving idea should come from the creation of a relocation budget in the first place.

A personal moving budget will help you distribute your money properly among the tasks ahead of you, and more importantly – it will alert you when a specific job requires more financial resources to be completed. This way, you will have a much better control on your spending and will be able to apply minor fixes to make sure the money you have set aside in the beginning is enough.

Select the best time to move out

If you have a certain amount of flexibility about choosing your moving date, then use that unique chance as one of your major cheap moving strategies. If you book your move very early, your mover may be willing to give you a price discount for early booking. If you select your move-out day during the off-peak moving season (September-May), you’re likely to get a killer deal around 20-30% off the standard moving companies rates, or even more.

Another budget-friendly moving tip is to avoid scheduling your moving date on national holidays, weekends, and the beginning and end of a month.

Save time to save money

Time is money, won’t you agree? Probably the simplest cheap moving idea you can use to your advantage when moving house is to organize your time in a clever way so that you end up saving huge chunks of time. And, by freeing more time on your schedule, you’ll be able to do more work or maybe even have a deserving rest period.

Create a moving calendar to fully utilize every hour of every day so that Moving day won’t catch you unprepared. Consult regularly with that moving checklist of yours and in no time you’ll be saving money by saving time.

Find the cheapest rates available

There are a number of good ways to move cheaply, and the cheapest way to move long distance is to find and hire the services of an affordable cross country mover. Now, it’s no secret that that’s much easier said than done but if you do your homework right, you can do it.

Invest some time in hunting down long distance movers with excellent reputation, request accurate price estimates from each one of them, compare the moving quotes very carefully, and go with the company that has offered the best conditions in terms of price and additional services.

Move less stuff across the country

Of all the tips for moving on a budget you may ever get, the best money saving advice is as clear as day: move only the things you’ll use again in the near future and get rid of what’s left. It’s very simple, really – the overall weight of your shipment determines how much you’ll pay in the end.

So, if you haven’t used some items in more than a year or you have completely forgotten about their existence, why would you want to pay to ship to across country to another home? Sort out your unwanted items, de-clutter your home and pack only the things that make sense for you.

Sell your unwanted items to make money

Knowing how to save money when moving house is good but knowing how to make money before moving out is even better. You just must consider turning your unwanted stuff into cash – extra money that will fuel your moving adventure to a successful end.

Once you’ve made up your mind what to take with you, organize a yard sale for all the things you’re leaving behind. Also, you can sell those no longer needed items online through specialized websites such as Facebook Marketplace, Craigslist etc.

Either way, use the earned money towards your moving expenses.

Get moving boxes for free

You may find it a bit hard to believe but your biggest single expense when packing up your home will be the cardboard boxes. The good news for you is that out of all the cheap moving tips, ideas and tricks, the one about finding free moving boxes has been actually proven to work.

You don’t have to pay for your cardboard boxes, at least not for all of them. Get good second-hand cardboard containers from friends who have recently moved house or get them for the asking from local businesses which are required to recycle all the boxes they don’t need anyway. Just think of all the money you’ll save this way!

Don’t pay for most packing materials

Speaking of money saving tips, did you know that your home is probably full of packing supplies which you can effectively use as an alternative to the ones your movers will bring? They won’t have the same high quality as professional packing supplies, but at least they will be 100% free of charge.

Baskets, buckets, trash cans, suitcases, drawers, and bags as moving containers, and blankets, bed sheets, towels, socks and other pieces of clothing as wrapping and cushioning materials. Also, you are free to use newspapers as a padding material as long as you don’t use the newsprint directly over delicate items with even more delicate surface.

Pack all you can by yourself

Regardless of whether you’re still looking for the cheapest way to move short distance or you’ve already found the cheapest way to move long distance, it’s the arduous process of packing that will make the most difference price-wise.

If don’t own any special and valuable items that require individual packing services by professional packers (a piano, for example), then you may as well attempt to pack up your home by yourself (and a few loyal friends, of course). If you can somehow manage to not pay for professional packers, then you’re sure to save tons of money on your local or cross country move.

Explore your job relocation options

If you’re moving across country for work, then the company you work for may be willing to pay a certain amount towards your moving expenses. Sometimes, your company may choose to cover all of your relocation costs, which is the ideal job relocation scenario.

Either way, if you’re moving soon, don’t forget to at least bring up the issue and try to negotiate your full or partial moving cost compensation. It never hurts to ask, right?

See if you’re eligible for tax deduction

If you happen to be moving across country for a full-time job and your new work place will be located less than 50 miles from your new home, then it’s possible that you be eligible for certain tax deduction related to your packing, transportation and storage expenses. That’s a monetary bonus you should not refuse, especially when you’re desperately looking for the cheapest way to move out of state.

Keep all of your receipts and documents relative to the cross country move and, upon your arrival, get in touch with a qualified tax consultant to check your tax deduction eligibility.

Be thrifty right after the move

Needless to say, your top priority when moving to another house in another part of the country is to use proven cheap moving tips and money saving tricks to keep as many dollar bills as possible, both in your wallet and bank account. However, your efforts to make your move cheaper should continue during the immediate post-move period as well. If not, then your genuine attempts to find the cheapest ways to move across the country could have been wasted.

Resist the strong temptation to purchase new things for your new home right after you’ve moved in. The adrenaline of having moved house successfully may easily temp you to overspend. Don’t do it. Instead, wait awhile until you are 100% sure you actually need whatever it is that you intend to buy.

Save money with Pony Express Moving Services. Lower prices than traditional moving companies and you don’t have to drive! Free moving quotes.

Post Move Unpacking Tips

This entry was posted in Packing Tips and tagged on by .

You’ve arrived in your new place! You must feel so relieved! Moving is hard work, and it starts with planning your relocation. Chances are, you’ve been on a long journey already, and you finally see the light at the end of the tunnel.

And yet… There’s still more to be done.

Once you arrive in your new home, you just want to feel at home. We can’t blame you. But you’re surrounded by boxes and feeling overwhelmed. (We can’t blame you for that either, for the record.)

Luckily, there’s a strategy for unpacking after a move. With a bit of pre-planning, you’ll be able to unpack and settle quickly so you can relax in your new place. Unpacking Tips

Get Organized First

Moving day is a crazy time for everyone, and there’s little you can do about that. Between emptying your old place into the moving truck, tying up loose ends, unloading the truck into your new home, and all of the bits and pieces in between, it makes for a hectic (and tiring) day.

Hopefully, you labeled all of your boxes when you packed. Clearly labeling your boxes helps to ensure they make it to the right place in your new home. If you unpack the right boxes in the right place, you’ll find the whole process much more straightforward.

Clean Up

Your landlord or previous tenant may have cleaned the place before you arrived, but the most they technically need to do is clear it of any visible dirt. Before you unpack boxes, take a moment to do a bit of cleaning.

Grab the cleaning essentials: broom, all-purpose cleaner, rags, and paper towels. Give a quick clean to floors and surfaces in each room before you start on your unpacking project. You’ll feel much more at home knowing it’s free of any sign of the previous tenants.

Unpack the Essentials

Did you pack an essentials box? Hopefully, you followed one of our favorite bits of advice and packed a box (or two, or three) of your most essential items. That includes bed sheets, pillows, bath towels, toiletries, medication, pajamas, and a change of clothes and underwear. For some of us, the coffee pot and mugs are also essential items!

Unpacking your essential items first means you’re ready for a shower and a good night’s sleep when the time comes. It also saves you frantically digging through boxes and hunting for the things you need.

Prioritize Your Rooms

If the thought of unpacking an entire house leads to overwhelm, remember you’re not doing it all at once. Start with the most important rooms first, and go from there. More than that (and depending on how you labeled your boxes) start with the most important items in the most important rooms.

Generally speaking, we recommend starting with the bedrooms. Start by making your bed and move to the other areas of the room. Fill your drawers and closet so you can easily carry on with your daily life (such as getting dressed for work or the gym) without tearing boxes open.

Next, move on to the kitchen, living space, and home office if you have one. Once you’ve tackled all of your main rooms you can move on to the rest, such as the dining room, any other living room, and storage.

Declutter As You Go

While you’re unpacking, remember one thing: make sure you don’t create a mess while you go. Of course, you’ll empty boxes and need to find a place. But keep organized and declutter as you empty your boxes. You’ll thank yourself later, trust us. You may empty your boxes a little slower, but it’s best that you take your time and empty your belongings into their rightful place as you do.

Save money with Pony Express Moving Services. Lower prices than traditional moving companies and you don’t have to drive! Free moving quotes.

Most Common Packing Mistakes

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Packing well is both an art and a science, and the people who hate packing (there are many) have forgotten this fact. Since many of us save our least favorite tasks for last, it’s no wonder that packing can quickly go wrong.

Most Common Packing MistakesPacking your things should never be an afterthought in your process of moving. It goes without saying that you need to pack smartly to protect your items in transit. You’ll also need to pack (and label) well so that unpacking is a breeze in your new home. The time you save in cutting corners comes back to you tenfold when it’s time to unpack, sort, and settle.

Here are some of the most common packing mistakes to look out for.

Procrastination

Whether you’re feeling a bit casual about the process or avoiding it as long as humanly possible, procrastination will come to bite you in the end.

You can follow all of the packing tips in the world, have all of your supplies together, and organize to a fault, but one thing is sure: if you delay to the last moment, all of your other preparations go out the window.

Start by assuming that you’re underestimating the time it will take you to pack. If you’re wrong, you’ll have bonus time left over. If you’re right, you’ll have given yourself ample time to pack without stress. Win-win, right?

This common packing mistake is so critical we could name it twice. Avoid procrastination, and the rest will more easily fall into place.

Winging It

Hand-in-hand with ample time is planning. Are you the breezy, in-the-flow, everything will work out in the end type? That’s great, for some things. When it comes to packing moving boxes, you need a bit more structure.

If planning and organization come naturally, you can skip this section. You’re probably already making lists, gathering necessities, and looking at a timeline leading to moving day. Keep it up!

For everyone else, take a note from the planners of the world. While it all may seem a bit neurotic, trust us: it will save you a lot of headaches. Going in without a plan may seem more comfortable at the outset, but inevitably things get missed, tasks forgotten, and you find yourself nearing moving day with a lot of stuff left on your plate.

Take the time to make to-do lists complete with dates to work toward. You’ll help ensure you don’t forget anything while saving yourself stress, time, and energy. Be sure to add the items you’re confident you’ll remember. You’ll either get a helpful reminder, or you’ll get an easy line to cross off.

Not Stocking Up on Supplies

When you get started with packing, make sure you have everything on hand. One of the worst things you can do in the packing process is to get on a roll, then have to stop and head out in search of more supplies.

Start with decluttering your home so you can get a good idea of what, exactly, you need to pack. Be discerning and sell, donate, or trash the things you don’t want, need, or use. There’s no sense in packing things that will just end up stashed in the back of closets or cupboards in your new home.

Once you’ve trimmed and organized your belongings, head out for all of your packing supplies. Sturdy boxes, quality packing tape, bubble wrap, foam sheets, and packing paper are a good place to start. Whatever you do: don’t forget the labels!

Labeling is crucial in the packing process. By clearly labeling your boxes (on multiple sides and the top, by the way), you’ll save yourself some time. Not only will you ensure they’re transported safely, your movers can also deliver the boxes to their appropriate rooms.

Packing Haphazardly

“I’m not going so far, this box will be okay.” Famous last words.

Don’t take for granted that your things will be safe in transit. Whether you’re moving down the block or across the country, you need to devote time and attention to how you pack your boxes. After all, moving day gets a bit hectic, and boxes do a lot of shifting between your current home and your new one.

Labeling helps tremendously (we did mention their importance, right?) but it’s no replacement for mindful packing. No need to overthink it and spend all of your time packing just so. Take the time to wrap your delicate items and use the right supplies for the right items.

Heavier items should go in smaller boxes. Lighter items such as linens, pillows, and clothing can go in larger ones. Specialty boxes are available for specific things, like dishes, glassware, and even wardrobe boxes for hanging clothes. Be deliberate about how you pack, and make sure your items arrive intact.

Save money with Pony Express Moving Services. Lower prices than traditional moving companies and you don’t have to drive! Free moving quotes.

Moving Out of Your Parents’ House

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So you’ve decided to leave the nest? Congratulations! Moving out of your parents’ house is a big deal. It’s a process that requires plenty of careful planning, consideration, and “adulting.” To help you successfully move out of your parents’ home, we’ve put together 13 easy steps that are sure to help you achieve the independence you want. Good luck and happy moving!

Moving Out of Your Parents’ House1. Communicate with your parents

Perhaps your parents are ready to see you go and have been encouraging your departure for a while. Or perhaps, they want you to stay forever. Whatever their opinion on the matter, it’s important to clearly communicate your intentions to them – and, if necessary, your moving plan. Remember: Even if they are excited about your new adventure, they could still be somewhat sad to see you go. With this in mind, make sure to be extra sensitive to their needs and emotions when communicating your move-out plans.

2. Develop a move-out plan

Before moving out of your parents’ house, come up with a moving plan that both you and your parents can agree upon. I recommend coming up with a goal date for when you think you will be able to move out. This doesn’t mean you have to move out by this date, but it is a starting point for you and your parents.

In addition to your move-out date, your moving plan should include where you intend to move, what type of property you want to move to (apartment, home, student housing, etc.), and whether you intend to have a roommate. Also, consider whether you will be hiring professional movers or doing the work yourself with the help of a few friends. You can change your mind on any of these as your plans progress, but having a framework will make it easier to get started.

3. Establish good credit

If you haven’t already established good credit, now’s the time to start. For those who want to purchase a home, be aware that a less than stellar credit score (or no credit score) means you’re less likely to obtain a home loan from a bank. If you’re unable to get a loan from a mortgage lender, you can kiss home-ownership goodbye (at least for now).

If you plan to rent, your credit history will also be important. Many landlords and property managers now run credit checks on rental applicants. By assessing a potential renter’s credit history, the landlord can get a good idea of whether or not the applicant pays bills and rent on time. Of course, those planning to rent without credit can usually have a co-signer, such as a relative with good credit, sign the lease as well. However, it’s a good idea to start building a healthy credit score in the meantime.

One of the easiest ways to establish good credit is to sign up for a credit card, use it to purchase anything from gas to concert tickets, and pay your bill on time in full every month, according to Experian. Or, you can establish good credit by paying your student loans or car loans on time. Although there are other ways to establish credit, such as joining a lending circle that loans money to its members, opening a credit card and making timely payments on loans are probably your best bet.

4. Start saving money for a down payment

If you’re planning to purchase a home, you’re going to need enough money in the bank for a down payment. To get there, we suggest coming up with a savings plan that is realistic and reasonable. Tip: This is the time to curb unnecessary spending. From temporarily canceling a gym membership and cooking at home to cutting back on shopping and travel expenses, there are many easy ways to save money.

Budgeting can also help you save money. Start by determining how much money you earn every month. Next, list your monthly expenses. This includes entertainment, meals out, student loan payments, gas, car payments, and insurance. If you’re not sure what you spend your money on, consider recording every penny you spend, where you spend it, and what you spend it on. Do this for at least a week, or better yet a month, to help with your budgeting. Calculate how much you spend each month on those items. If you spend $200 a month on gas, list it. Make adjustments as necessary, so you can save a certain amount every month towards your down payment.

5. Budget for after the move

Once you have a budget to help you save money for your down payment, it should be easy to create a budget to cover all of the expenses of owning or renting your own space. Some of your budget items will transfer directly from your current budget to your after-the-move budget. These include your loan payments, car insurance, and entertainment. But you may have to make some changes. If you live further or closer to work, you’ll need to adjust how much you budget for gas, for example.

Plus, you’ll have new expenses. If you don’t contribute to the family’s groceries, you’ll need to factor in that cost. You’ll also have to add your monthly rent or mortgage payment, utilities, and, if you purchase a house, HOA fees and property taxes.

Almost certainly, your largest budget line item will be your monthly mortgage or rent. If you’re planning to rent, your current monthly income should be more than enough to comfortably cover rental expenses, including the rent, utilities, rental insurance, and others.

If you’re planning to buy a home, we recommend speaking with a mortgage broker to determine how much house you can afford to buy. These brokers will take your gross annual income, credit history and debt (among other things) into consideration to figure out how much lenders will be willing to loan you. Sometimes that amount is higher than you can realistically afford. To avoid feeling “house poor,” we recommend purchasing a home that you can actually afford – and not one that stretches the budget.

6. Find a Realtor

After you’ve determined your budget and saved up enough money for a down payment, start looking for a reputable Realtor. If this is the first time you’ve ever purchased a home, enlisting a qualified and helpful Realtor is especially important. In addition to a real estate agent’s deep knowledge of the market, they also handle all negotiations and paperwork so you don’t have to. The right Realtor should be able to walk you through the home-buying process – keeping your interests, needs and budget top of mind.

What if a friend or a family member has a real estate license? Should you use them? According to Realtor.com, this might not be the best idea for several reasons. For starters, they may not have expertise in the neighborhood where you want to move, which can make it more difficult to find a good property. Second, if things turn sour, you may have to fire them and lose a friend in the process. Unless that friend or a family member has experience in the area where you want to move, consider politely declining their offer to represent you.

7. Schedule movers or ask your friends for help

Unless you have very little to move, we recommend enlisting either friends or professionals to assist with the move. If enlisting friends for a DIY move, consider renting a moving truck from a reputable company. If you’re hoping to hire professionals to help with part of the move, you can enlist labor-only movers to assist with loading and unloading the rental truck. This will most certainly be less expensive than hiring full-service movers to handle the entire move for you.

Be sure to schedule the movers (if you plan to use them) as far in advance as possible. Last-minute moves cost more than ones booked in advance. And if you wait too long, you may have a more difficult time finding movers available for your dates. Looking to save a little money on your move? Book your move on a weekday versus a weekend and anytime but the end of the month when leases usually end.

8. Donate, sell or consign items you don’t need

Have too much stuff? If your closets are overflowing, it may be time to get rid of your belongings before you move. After all, the less stuff you have to move, the easier (and cheaper) your move will be. Try donating gently-used items to local charities and consigning nicer items to local consignment stores. Also, consider throwing a garage sale or selling belongings via an online marketplace.

If you have a lot of junk to get rid of or large items you can’t donate or easily dispose of, you may want to hire a junk removal company. The company can remove unwanted mattresses, furniture, exercise equipment, and general junk. Let your parents know your plans, and if they have any items they want to get rid of, they may be willing to split the costs.

9. Find packing supplies

From boxes and tape to bubble wrap and foam pouches, you’re going to need to find packing and moving supplies to help with your next move. Fortunately, packing supplies can be found online, as well as at your workplace, nearby libraries, large retailers, and more. Also, check out this list of where to find free boxes. To find out the exact number of moving boxes you’ll need, use Moving.com’s handy Packing Calculator. Those looking for specific box sizes and shapes may have to resort to purchasing moving supplies.

Another option is to use plastic bins. You can rent these environmentally friendly containers from companies like U-Haul, Bungo Box, and Rent A Green Box. Some companies also rent moving supplies and sell sustainable packing supplies.

10. Pack

After gathering your supplies, it’s time to get packin’! We suggest packing non-essentials (those items you won’t need in the coming weeks) first. Examples are seasonal clothing, knickknacks, photos, books, etc. The day before you move, pack essentials, such as toiletries, pajamas, prescription meds, etc., in a separate box that can easily be found on moving day. Make sure to clearly label all boxes and keep important documents with you at all times.

If you are running out of time or need extra help, it is possible to hire packers to help you box your items for you. They’ll bring packing supplies with them, properly wrap and box your items, and do it in less time than you could. Expect to pay them by the hour and the number of people sent to get the job done.

11. Set up new utilities

News flash: If you’ve been living with your parents, you’ve been using their utilities. Unless you want to walk into a dark home with no electricity, you’ll need to set up utilities and cable in your new place as soon as possible. We recommend calling the utility companies early on to let them know when you’ll be moving in. Once you’ve scheduled dates for all utilities to be turned on, you’ll need to call the cable company to reserve an installation date as well.

12. Change your address

Unless you want your parents to receive your mail, change your address ASAP. Fortunately, USPS makes it easy. All you have to do is go to USPS.com and choose the date that you wish to begin forwarding your mail. Don’t forget to also change your credit card billing address and let your bank know that you’re moving. You may need to notify your college if you are attending school or your employer as well. To avoid confusion, it may also be helpful to send out an email to friends and family with your new address.

13. Move out and celebrate with a housewarming party

You did it! After saving your money and packing your bags, you’ve successfully moved out of your parents’ house and into your new place. Congratulations! This newfound freedom was certainly worth every tedious step along the way.

Want to celebrate (without disturbing your new neighbors, of course)? Consider throwing a housewarming party. It doesn’t have to be fancy: just a few friends, some budget-friendly food, and a great ambiance. But it gives you a chance to show off all that you’ve accomplished.

Ready to move?

Save money with Pony Express Moving Services When Moving Out of Your Parents’ House. Lower prices than traditional moving companies and you don’t have to drive! Free moving quotes.

How to Cut Your Moving Costs

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Moving can be a stressful time. With all of the little things to keep track of, it’s easy to get overwhelmed. And that’s before you even start tallying up the cost of getting to your new place.

Moving costs can often catch people by surprise. The desire to save money can also lead to some drastic and less comfortable decisions, like assuming you can handle the grunt work all on your own.

Before you decide to push all of your belongings to the roadside so you don’t have to deal with moving, check out our tips on cutting moving costs.

How to Cut Your Moving CostsCollect Free Boxes

If you want to save some money, start with the packing supplies. Rather than paying for moving boxes, try collecting free ones. Places like liquor stores, bookshops, and groceries are great places to find boxes that would otherwise be discarded. Be careful to collect boxes in relatively good shape, particularly if you have fragile things to pack. Make sure to reinforce the seams with packing tape for extra care.

For most (if not all) of your items, you don’t need to buy bubble wrap and packing peanuts. Try using rags, towels, clothes, and other soft items to wrap fragile and delicate items. Clearly label your boxes on multiple sides to keep them extra safe.

Choose Your Dates Carefully

The principles of supply and demand apply to moving and prices fluctuate accordingly. If you are able to plan your move to save money, consider moving in the lower season between late fall and early spring. Even if you don’t have the luxury to choose the time of year, you can (hopefully) still choose your day and time. Holidays and weekends are more expensive than mid-week moves. That means you’ll cut your moving costs by scheduling your move on a weekday.

Do Your Own Packing and Prepping

While full-service movers can pack everything in your house for you, it will cost you. If you’re looking to cut moving costs, handle all of the packing yourself. As most movers calculate cost based, in part, on the amount of time it takes for your relocation, the more preparation you do ahead of time, the better. Disassemble furniture yourself and collect boxes in an accessible place.

Pull in Favors

Other costs can add up, like cleaning and making repairs in your place before you leave. Call in some favors with friends and family and see if they’ll come for a bit of a practicality-centric going away party.

The same goes for child and pet care on moving day. Having your kids – the two- or four-legged kind – running around can be dangerous for both them and the movers. Enlist the help of a trusted person in your life and save the cost of daycare.

Downsize

Since movers charge based on how long the move will take, you can assume that the more you have, the more it will cost you. If you want to cut your moving costs, take a moment to do some downsizing.

We recommend doing a bit of a purge before every move. Why bother packing and unpacking things you don’t want or need? Relocating is an excellent opportunity for a fresh start. You might even make some money if you have things to get rid of that you could sell. Give yourself enough time to sort, evaluate, list, and complete the transaction without pressure.

Check for Tax Deductions

Save your moving receipts – you never know how they may come in handy. If you’re moving for work, you may be entitled to a tax deduction on your moving expenses so keep good (and official) records.

Save money with Pony Express Moving Services When Moving. Lower prices than traditional moving companies and you don’t have to drive! Free moving quotes.

Millennials Moving Tips

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Millennials are growing up; managing your first move without the benefits of parental castoffs or finances. The first thing you may have discovered about picking up sticks and relocating is that the expenses mount up fast. The second thing is that it’s going to take mad organizational skills to get everything you own from point A to point B without mistaking your X-Box box for your Ninja box.

Millennials Moving TipsUse Your Tech for Good

There are tons of apps to help you organize a move–they’ll track everything from your packing (store photos of what you put in every box) to setting up utilities (big life skill) to hiring a moving company. You can share the info with roommates or family so everybody is always on the same page.

Low-Tech Still Rules for Moving

All the fun apps in the world can’t replace old-fashioned boxes and packing tape. Here’s a moving tip that you’ll use for the rest of your life–get small boxes. Sure, you can get more stuff in a large box, but they get heavy very fast. Lots of small boxes are more useful than a few giant ones.

So, you’ll need boxes, packing tape (spring for the tape gun), some newsprint or bubble wrap for padding, and markers. If you’re really organized, you can use color coded markers for your boxes, but most people are happy with a black wide-tip Sharpie.

One large box that’s worth investing in is a wardrobe box–a heavy duty box with a metal hanging bar across the top. You can stow your hanging clothes in this box and not worry about wrinkles and dry cleaning when you unpack. Check with your local moving company for any specialty boxes that you might require.

Allow Yourself Plenty of Time

Remember when you were in college and could pack up and move to another apartment (or room in the frat house) in an afternoon? Forget that. Now you have furniture, electronics, kayaks, and all the stuff that you used to keep in your parent’s basement. Not to mention your t-shirt collection. Give yourself a couple of weeks at least to pack up for your move–the further you’re going, the more time you’ll need.

A good rule of thumb is a few days for each room–you can pack up a studio apartment a lot faster than you can a two-bedroom condo. Collect all the stuff you don’t use or don’t need–donate it, give it away or throw it out.

Realize Your Limitations

Sure, you’re young and ready to take on the world, but you may still need professional movers, especially if you have stuff like a motorcycle or a jet ski. If you’re moving a long distance and flying to your new home, you’ll also likely need to transport your car. Professional movers can pack and move ALL your stuff for you, and you won’t have to worry about it not getting there in one piece.

If it’s at all in your budget, seriously consider hiring a professional moving company for your move. If you’re relocating for a job, your relocation package probably includes this bonus, so definitely take advantage of it.

Take a Selfie

Nothing is ever real until it’s a story on social media, so be sure to take a picture as soon as you’re in your new house.

Save money with Pony Express Moving Services. Lower prices than traditional moving companies and you don’t have to drive! Free moving quotes.

Moving Plants to Your New Home

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Plants are part of what makes a house feel like a home. If you’ve spent months or years taking care of your plants, it can be hard to think about leaving them behind or giving them away when you move. Thankfully, plants can be moved – it just takes some planning.

Tips on Moving Plants

How you go about moving your plants largely depends on what kind of plants you’re dealing with. For most potted plants, the process is fairly simple. But for outdoor plants or larger indoor plants, the process is a little more complex.

Indoor Plants

Small plants are the easiest to move, since you can keep them in their current pots and simply place them in an open box for transport. It’s a good idea to stuff the gaps in the box with paper to prevent the plants from moving around too much when you’re on the move.

Keep in mind that many moving companies can’t transport plants, so it’s best to plan to move them in a separate vehicle with you. This is also best for the plants since you can try to regulate the temperature and keep them happy during the move.

Larger houseplants may need to be trimmed or pruned first before you move them. If it’s cold out on moving day, wrap your plants in newspaper first to protect them and keep them warm. Many plants are quite sensitive to temperature changes, so you want to keep them as stable as possible.

If you’re moving a longer distance with plants in your car, you’ll need to take care of them along the way. Treat them as you would your pets; bring them inside with you if you’re stopping overnight. Don’t leave them in the car – if it gets too hot or too cold, the plants could get damaged. If you’re worried about transporting them on your own, you can also pay to have your plants shipped, but this can be expensive. You may be better off not moving them if you’ve got a long way to travel.

Outdoor Plants

Outdoor plants can be a little trickier to move, so you should consider this before you start the process. It may be easier to leave certain plants behind if the process is going to be too complex.

Before you move larger plants, it’s a good idea to trim them back. This makes them easier to move and can help with regrowth when you plant them again at your new place. They should also be watered well before you begin the process, in order to make sure the roots and soil stay moist during the move. Next, you’ll want to dig up your plants, making sure to leave lots of dirt around the roots and keeping as much of the root as possible.

For smaller plants, the roots and dirt can be placed in paper bags – this is better than plastic because it allows the plants to breathe. For larger plants trees, and shrubs, the root ball should be wrapped in burlap to hold everything together. Plants can stay wrapped like this for a few weeks as long as they are kept watered and don’t get too hot, so you can do this prep work ahead of time.

Make sure to keep them in the shade during the move, as plants can be quite sensitive to temperature changes. Once you get to your new home, you’ll want to replant everything as soon as possible. Keep in mind that they may take some time to adjust to the new soil after you plant them again, so they might not immediately look as luscious as they once did. But with time and care, they’ll be happy and flourishing in their new home!

Save money with Pony Express Moving Services. Lower prices than traditional moving companies and you don’t have to drive! Request a free quote online.

Moving Out of Your College Dorm

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Most moves you undergo in your life come with a lot of preparation time. You have plenty of time to pack, choose your method of transportation, and plan the process. But moves after graduation or for summer vacation often don’t come with the same conveniences.

Whether you need to leave your dorm or apartment at the end of the term or the end of your undergraduate career, leaving your dorm can come with both emotional and logistical complications.

Use the six tips below to simplify the trip away from your school dorm and toward your home or future.

1. Start the Process Early

Between exam preparation and final project completion, you don’t have a lot of time at the end of a school term. And while it might feel like you left most of your belongings at your parents’ or in a storage unit, you may be surprised at how much stuff you have with you when you begin packing.

Start by packing up your seasonal clothing and decorations. Then move on to items you don’t use every day.

2. Clean As You Go

You may dread cleaning checks (and put off completing them until the last possible moment), but they provide good practice for moving out. Make a sincere effort to clean more than you typically do for at least the last month of the term.

As you work on sorting and packing, clean every area you empty. Once you clear the space under your bed, shift it and vacuum thoroughly. When you remove your dishes from the cupboards, wipe the surfaces down.

These small cleaning tasks ensure that you won’t have to spend time complying with cleaning requirements the day before you leave.

3. Sort Your Belongings

Packing can feel intimidating, but it will only feel more so the longer you avoid it. To make the process seem less overwhelming, sort your possessions before you begin to really pack.

You can create more piles as needed, but start with these general categories:

  • Items you’ll use: Think about the clothing, books, and other belongings you actually use when school isn’t in session. Wait to pack these items until you’ve taken care of everything else.
  • Items you need but won’t use: These items may include winter clothes, textbooks, and seasonal decorations. Pack these belongings early to ensure you find a place, such as a storage unit, to keep them. Then you won’t have to drag them around with you.
  • Items you don’t use: What do you own that you never touch? If you can donate or throw out these items, you’ll have less to worry about during your move.

Grouping your belongings as you pack simplifies and streamlines the process, so don’t forget this step.

4. Divide Your Move Into Parts

In addition to separating your possessions according to their use, divide the move itself into multiple events if you can. As you begin to fill boxes, ship them or place them in storage. It’s harder to clean a room full of boxes than an empty dorm space.

If you live near the home you’ll stay at during the off season, take your packed belongings with you when you make visits. Using this method decreases the amount of stuff you have to transport on the last day of the term.

5. Pack With What’s Convenient

While you have to protect breakable items in transit, most of your belongings will survive non-traditional packing materials. Start by collecting the packing supplies you already have, which may include the following:

  • Garbage bags
  • Food boxes and other cardboard containers
  • Laundry baskets or hampers
  • Purses and/or backpacks
  • Suitcases and travel bags

As you pack, use these containers wisely. Wrap fragile items in clothing or household linens and place them in solid containers, like shoe boxes. Pack heavy objects in smaller containers, like purses, to ensure that you and your helpers can easily lift each package.

6. Use Your Resources

Packing for an out-of-dorm move can quickly become frustrating. During each step of the process, remember to take advantage of your resources.

People you know, both on and off campus, may represent your most valuable resources. They can help with any of the following:

  • Heavy lifting: You may have a hard time moving all your possessions out of your dorm room on your own. To simplify the process, enlist the help of athletes you know, your parents or siblings, or your roommates.
  • Packing materials: If you don’t have enough packing materials, ask for help from your dorm mates, resident adviser, roommates or local stores.
  • Transportation: If you don’t have a car of your own, you probably know exactly who does. Stay in these folks’ good graces so you’ll have an easier time of moving your belongings from place to place.

When you enlist the help of family and friends, moving out of your dorm or college apartment becomes an easier process.

You’ll have plenty of things to do in the lead up to graduation or summer vacation. But by following these tips, you can ensure that your trip away from your temporary home goes as smoothly as possible.

Save money with Pony Express Moving Services. Lower prices than traditional moving companies and you don’t have to drive! Request a free quote online.